History of the Aqueduct Trail

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Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park

For more than 165 years, the trail atop the Old Croton Aqueduct has linked communities and a wealth of historic sites along the lower Hudson River. Locals will often say,"Let's go for a walk along the Aqueduct," referring to the footpath atop the masonry water tunnel. Both the trail and the tunnel (also known as the "tube") comprise the Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park.

The park was created in 1968 and encompasses the northernmost 26 miles of the Aqueduct and its right-of-way, from Croton Gorge County Park to the Yonkers-New York City line. It lies wholly within Westchester County. It is under the jurisdiction of the Taconic Region of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

The appeal of the trail lies in the great diversity of scenes it traverses. Thus, a walk on the Aqueduct can take you not only through stretches of leafy green space but also past backyards and local parks, "Main Street" village centers, great and small historic sites, trickling rivulets and grand Hudson views. It is open to pedestrians, joggers, cyclists, cross-country skiers and equestrians. Photographers, bird watchers,naturalists and historians enjoy it as well. Cyclists are requested to avoid the trail after heavy rains and during the “mud season.”

The site manager of the park is Gary Ricci. He has a staff of three maintenance men who are responsible for the care and repair of the 26.2 miles of the trail that runs through many municipalities in the river community. Gary works closely with the Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct on events and of course on plans for the upcoming Visitor and Education center in the historic Keeper's House. He can be reached at 914-693-5269